Au-pair

aupair

An interesting solution is an “au-pair” – quite popular among, at least middle-class, Turkish families. Often, a foreigner, a Philippine, an Uzbek or another yabanci stays with the family or actually lives with them to look after the kids and the house. It gives the parents, or the mother, to work and do things for herself. An au-pair will cook dinner, do basic cleaning (there is another lady for full house cleaning), play with the kid (s), spend time at the playground, lay the table and do many other tasks.

It’s quite comfortable.

And quite expensive too.

And it’s not something to easily come across in Poland. A nanny, even a baby sitter is a considerable cost in Poland. A full time nanny may earn as much as an average teacher or secretary. You would rather see a model when a woman doesn’t work as it doesn’t make sense. She’d stay with the kid as the nanny would consume her salary. It’s opposite here. Women wouldn’t be able to work and have a proper career if it hadn’t been for a nanny.

But it’s a means to show yourself too. You can afford a nanny. A picture you often see is a nanny accompanying a family at a restaurant or other social place – a cinema, a theatre carrying a baby for its mother , playing or simply being with the kid while parents are involved in conversations or other activities with other parents.

This is all interesting.

But most interesting for me is how the kids feel. Can’t actually say much about it.

It seems to me, though, that first – the parents do know what it’s like to be a real parent. What it’s like to pick up the toys scattered around the house ALL THE TIME, prepare favourite dishes and hear that the kids will not eat them, put kids to bed, clean the dinner remnants from the floor, remove play doh from the carpet or be ashamed for the spilled juice or a broken glass in a restaurant.

Secondly, the kids grow more attached to the nanny rather than to the parents.

How’s that?

It’s convenient. Maybe a must for the busy businessmen and women. But is it actually worth it?

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